The Pirates best young pitchers have had success this season.

Pittsburgh Pirates Caffeine: Taillon, Allie, Heredia


The Pittsburgh Pirates have some seriously talented young pitchers. If you just look at the stats alone and make a decision on the Pirates young talent, it makes you look foolish. You had all summer to go see the Pirates young pitchers, if you haven’t been able to get your eyes on them, watch some videos.

We have reason to believe the Pirates have done some good things with Jameson Taillon, Luis Heredia, and Stetson Allie. Each have things to learn, especially Allie who got a dose of humble pie again in his last outing, but each are healthy and finishing their seasons strong.

Probably too strong for Allie. We had a chance to see him pitch last week. He’s the real deal.

We hear his only enemy seems to be himself, particularly when he is on the mound. The latest example came Saturday night when the hard throwing right hander issued three walks in an outing for the third time this month.

In August, Allie has thrown 5.2 innings with eleven strikeouts. The bad guys are hitting just .167 off him in his past ten games. If only he hadn’t walked 12 batters in the month of August…..because he has allowed no hits in Pennsylvania’s dog days. Yeh, throwing strikes is important.

It would be foolish to think any one of three would dominate their respective leagues, but each has done just that on a few occassions.  It’s important to remember, throwing fastballs, no matter how hard they are thrown, will be batting practice for some of the bad guys, even if they are minor leaguers.

But we think the big three will be better for it. Being able to throw a fastball where they want, when they want, is a skill only a handful of the best pitchers possess. There is one way to improve it, and that’s to do it in game situations. The young Pirates pitchers worked on it each and every outing this year.

Everyone knows Tim Williams and his team does some nice work, especially with this video on Luis Heredia.  It’s impressive to see the contact made on Heredia is mostly to right field.  Heredia is 17 years old.  He had a solid season. It’s sick to imagine him in two years.

The Jameson Taillon domination Pirates fans have been hoping for happened yesterday.  Unlike Allie, Taillon hasn’t walked a batter in three straight starts.  In those past three starts, the big Texan has held opponents to just two earned runs while striking out 18.

Yeh, Taillon is getting dialed in.  Big time.

 

Allie was in Pittsburgh in the middle of the month with some of the State College Spikes.

Follow RumBunter on Twitter

Next Pirates Game View full schedule »
Wednesday, Aug 2727 Aug12:35St. Louis CardinalsBuy Tickets

Tags: Jameson Taillon Luis Heredia Stetson Allie

  • JBubs

    Just viewed the Heredia video. My comment is not meant to be judgemental, but to be objective. That said, one thing that struck me about the video was that Luis seems to have a short stride towards the plate. If this is true (and I may be mistaken given a restricted vantage point through the video) this would increase the distance of his release point to the plate, and this would result in a decrease in his relative ball speed only because it lengthens the time a batter has to react to the pitch. Seems to me if a batter had a choice of a 95 mph fast ball thrown from second base or a 95 mph fast ball thrown from the grass in front of the pitcher’s mound, he would choose the first. And If the same batter had a choice of a 100 mph fastball released by Luis from five feet in front of the rubber or from seven feet in front of the rubber, he would choose the first. Point is if Luis does have a stride that is a bit short, is any one working with him to lengthen it?

  • JBubs

    Just viewed the Heredia video. My comment is not meant to be judgemental, but to be objective. That said, one thing that struck me about the video was that Luis seems to have a short stride towards the plate. If this is true (and I may be mistaken given a restricted vantage point through the video) this would increase the distance of his release point to the plate, and this would result in a decrease in his relative ball speed only because it lengthens the time a batter has to react to the pitch. Seems to me if a batter had a choice of a 95 mph fast ball thrown from second base or a 95 mph fast ball thrown from the grass in front of the pitcher’s mound, he would choose the first. And If the same batter had a choice of a 100 mph fastball released by Luis from five feet in front of the rubber or from seven feet in front of the rubber, he would choose the first. Point is if Luis does have a stride that is a bit short, is any one working with him to lengthen it?