Pittsburgh Pirates: Projecting 2021 Starting Rotation After Trading Jameson Taillon

Aug 30, 2020; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Steven Brault throws a pitch in the first inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 30, 2020; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Steven Brault throws a pitch in the first inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park. Mandatory Credit: Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports /
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Sep 17, 2020; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates manager Derek Shelton (left) congratulates starting pitcher Steven Brault (43) on his complete game victory over the St. Louis Cardinals at PNC Park. Pittsburgh won 5-1. Mandatory Credit: Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 17, 2020; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates manager Derek Shelton (left) congratulates starting pitcher Steven Brault (43) on his complete game victory over the St. Louis Cardinals at PNC Park. Pittsburgh won 5-1. Mandatory Credit: Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports /

As the offseason rolls on, so do the trades being made by the Pittsburgh Pirates. After trading Jameson Taillon to the New York Yankees, for the second time in a week the Pirates have traded away one of their starting pitchers.

The other starting pitcher traded was right-hander Joe Musgrove, who was sent to the San Diego Padres last week in arguably Ben Cherington’s best trade as general manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates. Following the Musgrove trade we took a look at what the Pirate starting rotation could look like in 2021. Now that Taillon has been traded, that outlook changes.

So, now that Taillon is gone, what could the starting rotation look like for the Pittsburgh Pirates when the 2021 season begins? Before we go any further brace yourselves, cover your eyes, grab some heart medicine, and maybe pop a few Xanax… because things could be ugly this season.

But, hey, that’s part of a rebuild. You expect some ugly, and when that ugly is ugly enough to potentially net you the number one overall pick in the draft for a second year in a row, it’s not necesarrily a bad thing. At least the Pittsburgh Pirates have fully committed to tanking and rebuilding.

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