Pittsburgh Pirates: Best Picks From Each of the First 10 Rounds

PITTSBURGH, PA - OCTOBER 07: Tony Watson #44 of the Pittsburgh Pirates throws a pitch in the seventh inning during the National League Wild Card game against the Chicago Cubs at PNC Park on October 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
PITTSBURGH, PA - OCTOBER 07: Tony Watson #44 of the Pittsburgh Pirates throws a pitch in the seventh inning during the National League Wild Card game against the Chicago Cubs at PNC Park on October 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images) /
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Ed Whitson, pitcher for the San Diego Padres during the Major League Baseball National League West game against the Philadelphia Phillies on 16 May 1990 at Jack Murphy Stadium, San Diego, California, United States. The Phillies won the game 6 – 5. (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Allsport/Getty Images)
Ed Whitson, pitcher for the San Diego Padres during the Major League Baseball National League West game against the Philadelphia Phillies on 16 May 1990 at Jack Murphy Stadium, San Diego, California, United States. The Phillies won the game 6 – 5. (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Allsport/Getty Images) /

Round 6: Ed Whitson

In 1974, the Pittsburgh Pirates picked Ed Whitson in the sixth-round of the MLB draft. The right-hander made his way up the Pirates’ minor league organizations but didn’t play all that much in a Pirate uniform. He was used as a swing-man for the Pirates, appearing in 67 games, including nine starts across two-and-a-half seasons. Whitson provided a 3.73 ERA, 3.93 FIP, and 1.439 WHIP through 147.1 innings.

In late June 1979, the Pirates dealt Winston to the San Francisco Giants with Fred Breining and Al Holland for a three-player package. Although that package included Bill Madlock, Whitson caught his stride after being given a chance to start games regularly.

From 1980 through the end of his career in 1991, Winston established himself as a rock-solid starting pitcher. He would go on to pitch to the tune of a 3.79 ERA, 3.84 FIP, and 1.30 WHIP. Although Whitson didn’t excel in anything in particular, given his 0.9 HR/9 rate, poor 13.1% K-rate, and 6.9% walk rate, he put up solid results everywhere he went.

Whitson would pitch for the Giants, Cleveland, San Diego Padres, and New York Yankees. He retired after his age-36 campaign. He may never have been a top of the rotation arm, but he was a reliable arm everywhere he pitched.

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