Pittsburgh Pirates Prospects: 2022 Minor League Statistical Leaders

BRADENTON, FLORIDA - MARCH 16: Mike Burrows #93 of the Pittsburgh Pirates poses for a picture during the 2022 Photo Day at LECOM Park on March 16, 2022 in Bradenton, Florida. (Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images)
BRADENTON, FLORIDA - MARCH 16: Mike Burrows #93 of the Pittsburgh Pirates poses for a picture during the 2022 Photo Day at LECOM Park on March 16, 2022 in Bradenton, Florida. (Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images) /
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Pittsburgh Pirates
Aug 11, 2021; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates general manager Ben Cherington (left) talks with manager Derek Shelton (right) during batting practice before the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at PNC Park. Mandatory Credit: Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports /

The Pittsburgh Pirates had many prospects who performed well throughout the minor league system, but who was the leaders in the most important catergories?

The Pittsburgh Pirates wrapped up their 2022 season on Wednesday, and the last game of the minor leagues was on September 28th when the Indianapolis Indians fell to Columbus Clippers 3-11. It wasn’t the most fabulous send-off, but that doesn’t mean that the Pirates didn’t have many good seasons from their system this year.

Today, I want to take a look at each of the Pirates’ minor league statistical leaders. There are many stats to evaluate players, but for batters, we’ll look at wRC+, OBP, slugging percentage, OPS, wOBA, walk rate, strikeout rate, and BB:K ratio. For pitchers, we’ll evaluate them through ERA, FIP, xFIP, WHIP, walk rate, K:BB ratio, and opponent average. Last year when we looked through the Pirates’ minor league statistical leaders, we only looked at position players and starting pitchers, but we will also look at relievers this season.

For this, I am looking at batters with at least 300 plate appearances, so you won’t see any prospects from the Dominican Summer League or Florida Complex League. For starting pitchers, I am considering arms who started 12 games, and for relievers, we’re looking at guys with at least 50 IP out of the bullpen and less than three starts.

So without further ado, let’s look at our first leader.

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