Pittsburgh Pirates: Looking at Their Last Five Gold Glove Winners

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 13: Corey Dickerson #12 of the Pittsburgh Pirates looks on during batting practice of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on April 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mitchell Layton/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 13: Corey Dickerson #12 of the Pittsburgh Pirates looks on during batting practice of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on April 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mitchell Layton/Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit
Prev
3 of 3
Next
Apr 14, 2008; Los Angeles, CA, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Nate McLouth (13) breaks his bat during 6-4 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 14, 2008; Los Angeles, CA, USA; Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Nate McLouth (13) breaks his bat during 6-4 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-USA TODAY Sports /

Nate McLouth

Nate McLouth somehow won a Gold Glove in 2008. Strangely enough, he was one of the league’s worst defenders. Of course, this was an era before voters started to consider more advanced and more accurate defensive metrics heavily. Defensive runs saved were created just five years prior, and ultimate zone rating wasn’t much older at six years. Outs above average wouldn’t become a stat for another eight seasons.

Despite that, McLouth had -23 defensive runs saved, the third-fewest in all of baseball. He was far from the worst defender in terms of UZR/150, but -12.3 is nothing to be proud of. McLouth had a -2.1 defensive WAR that season, making it one of the worst defensive seasons to win a Gold Glove ever.

Next. Prospect Season in Review: Abrahan Gutierrez. dark

Three National League center fielders, including Carlos Beltran, Cody Ross, and Shane Victorino, racked up double-digit positives in defensive runs saved. Both Beltran and Ross were in the double-digit positives of UZR/150 as well. The only explanation that could possibly be given is that he had the highest fielding percentage among players with 1000+ innings played in center field, committing just a single error and having a .997 FP. Of course, knowing what we know today of how inaccurate errors are, something like this will probably never happen again.

facebooktwitterreddit