Pittsburgh Pirates: Looking at Ridiculous Trades Baseball Trade Values Thinks Are Fair

Baseball Trade Values is a popular site among fans, but its main feature, the trade simulator, can be used to make ridiclous trades that are fair in their eyes.

World Series - Arizona Diamondbacks v Texas Rangers - Game One
World Series - Arizona Diamondbacks v Texas Rangers - Game One / Sam Hodde/GettyImages
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Baseball Trade Values is a popular site among fans, but it can be extremely inaccurate. Here are three examples of Pittsburgh Pirates trades that are considered 'fair', but are totally ridiculous

Baseball Trade Values has become popular among the baseball community, but not for the right reasons. It is a trade simulator where you can throw together mock trades involving any player you want between any team. Each player has an assigned value. For example, the most valuable players in the Pittsburgh Pirates and their entire organization are Paul Skenes (+61), Oneil Cruz (+50), and Jack Suwinski (+38.5). There are also negative values, which are typically for players that are on expensive contracts.

But many of the values are questionable at best and wildly inaccurate at worst. They don't claim that the values are 100% accurate, but they do claim they think they are reasonable. But because you can throw any player into any trade between any team, the trade simulator can be used to make some ridiculously unfair trades that are still seen as fair in the eye of their simulator. But that’s what I want to look at today: absolutely ridiculous trades that in no way are fair except in the eyes of Baseball Trade Values. 

These trades are not meant to be taken seriously. Each one of these is intentionally created to show how bad Baseball Trade Simulator can be. At the end of each trade, I will link to what the trade looks like on their simulator.